Philosopher. Author of Formal Dialectics and Bring Back Satire. Editor and founder of Serious Philosophy https://medium.com/serious-philosophy

CRYPTOCURRENCY

The fascinating thing about DeFi is that relatively small amounts of money, when invested wisely, can rapidly become much larger — outpacing even the bull market itself.

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Photo by Dylan Gillis on Unsplash

We read a lot about DeFi volumes and so on these days, but there aren’t many articles explaining how to make money with retail solutions anyone can operate. Let’s do our part to remedy that situation by looking at what Nexo is and exploring a few scenarios in which we might stand to make a remarkable return under current conditions, if the bull market holds.

The fascinating thing about DeFi is that relatively small amounts of money invested wisely can rapidly become much larger — outpacing even the bull market itself. Using Nexo’s leveraging option and the techniques we’ll be going over in this article, I’ve made about $700 by investing $1000 into Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Nexo back when the Bitcoin price was about $13,000. You may notice that the return is 70%, while BTC prices are only up about $5500/$13000 or 42%. The numbers are a bit weird because I’ve been spending some of the returns by sending USD from Coinbase to Venmo and then swiping my Venmo card, but the general point is simple enough to understand: Nexo lets us take loans out using cryptocurrency as collateral, and if we time our plays for periods when crypto is increasing in value or bull markets, we’re able to massively increase our exposure to the rising prices in a most remarkable way. …


CRYPTOCURRENCY

Analyzing the minor BTC sell-off that happened during Thanksgiving helps us understand the forces pushing BTC to new all-time highs.

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This article is brought to you by Cryptowriter.

In philosophy, everything is instructive. Since Aristotle said (paraphrasing) everyone who speaks is in a way right, and in a way wrong, we’ve known we needed to take in views from all available perspectives regarding a given issue to give ourselves the best chance at understanding what’s going on.

everyone who speaks is in a way right, and in a way wrong

— Aristotle

I’ve even taken it so far as to develop a formal system for evaluating propositions at the factual level of worldview; most of the views I disagree with, I do so because there is no logical way for the facts to actually add up and prove the stated or argued-for conclusion. …


CRYPTOCURRENCY

Thanksgiving is over. What will the most important number in cryptocurrency do next?

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I believe it’s safer to ask ‘when’ at this point, rather than ‘if’ Bitcoin (BTC) will hit $1T in market capitalization. Though the price will need to roughly triple, bullish sentiment seems at an all-time high as some of the biggest skeptics on the cryptocurrency issue begin to re-evaluate their positions. Growth has been outstanding recently, with a slew of celebrity investments from notables including Maisie Williams from Game of Thrones. Additionally, bulls point to increasing support from the federal government which has allowed institutional money to begin to flow into the crypto space.

Republicans are quick to point to a group of Democrats who have opposed certain crypto-related issues in government recently, but perhaps they too easily dismiss the evidence that Democrats are pro-cryptocurrency. In addition to massive support from the left on the blockchain voting measures taken by the United States Postal Service, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi floated the possibility of a crypto-based stimulus payment system earlier this year during the discussions that led to the CARES Act. …


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Photo by “My Life Through A Lens” on Unsplash

The Great Free Will Debate is a forum for discussion of how minds work and what they are. Our goal will be to elaborate upon the extant free will discussion, and I view my own purpose as an effort to advance the work ongoing in the cognitive sciences as a way to resolve the popular debate about whether or not we can have free will. It is a nuanced debate, and you, as a writer, as a thinker, as a philosopher — you’re free to respond in any way you like.

If your response is an essay that can interface with the articles you find on the subject of free will around the internet in a helpful and constructive way, even if the helpful and constructive activity is pointing people away from the free will debate because it has become antiquated (insert your own objection here, if you like!), then feel free to join Serious Philosophy as a writer and air your views on this Medium publication. …


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Photo by “My Life Through A Lens” on Unsplash

The Existentialist Book Club is a forum for discussion of books. Primarily books from the existentialist movement in philosophy, a movement which has roots in either Kierkegaard or Nietzsche (or perhaps both) depending upon who you listen to on the matter. The purpose of this reading group is to allow people who have an interest in these books to discuss all of the insights that can arise immediately and over time after reading them.

Medium is a social media platform. It is not a platform for academic journal standards. Here at Serious Philosophy, we aim to build a community in which people are able to discuss their views at length and with some depth regarding the various subjects we take interest in. For now, there are two communities: Existentialist Book Club and The Great Free Will Debate. Authors can respond to other club authors, bring new books into the discussion by leaving responses to this post, or write about the subjects more broadly. …


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Photo by Felicia Buitenwerf on Unsplash

Hey everyone! Thanks for following Serious Philosophy.

I’m excited to announce a new Serious Philosophy Discussion for your reading (and/or writing!) pleasure: The Great Free Will Debate.

Have a look, there is one essay there but responses will hopefully be quite forthcoming. We still have The Existentialist Book Club, so feel free to poke around that project as well.

If you’re interested in writing, send your username in a DM on Twitter to @seriousphiloso1 (https://twitter.com/SeriousPhiloso1). To write for these projects, you’ll need to tag your article with the discussion “thegreatfreewilldebate” or “Existentialist Book Club,” respectively.

I’ll start doing monthly newsletters that showcase notable stories as well, just to keep everyone up to speed.

https://medium.com/serious-philosophy/thegreatfreewilldebate/home

Cheers,

Thomas Dylan Daniel
Founder and Editor-in-Chief
Serious Philosophy


PHILOSOPHY

In the age of cognitive neuroscience, we have better ways of discussing why we do what we do than ‘free’ or ‘unfree.’

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Photo by Becca Tapert on Unsplash

I’ve been out of academic philosophy since I quit teaching in 2016, but even standing outside and gazing in I can’t help but notice that people still think there’s some benefit to be had by indulging in the Great Free Will Debate. So much amazing work is going on in the neurosciences, and sadly philosophers find themselves inclined to resist the incursion into their territory instead of embracing the new knowledge and terminology that could elucidate some of the biggest problems surrounding this discussion.

Many philosophers do choose to participate in this new discipline, which has been ascendant in recent years as a direct heir of the cognitivist framework that found itself growing rapidly as early as the 1960s. But mainstream or pure philosophy still features a prominent behaviorist institution: the great free will debate. …


Writing online has changed the way I do… everything. Somehow, I’m more stable now than I’ve ever been.

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Photo by Dan Dimmock on Unsplash

My first real effort to create a book yielded Formal Dialectics (2018), a monster in the dusty old tome genre of peer-reviewed philosophy that took me four years. In it, I showed off the chops I’d developed in grad school: explicit prose, incontrovertible logical proofs, and finally the element I was most proud of: depth. The book could hold water, the reasoning and analysis were so tight. Why, I asked myself for the next year or so, was it so terribly difficult to get anyone to buy it?

I had always been a writer, even before taking my first creative writing course as an undergrad. There was always praise heaped upon me in English class whenever the assignment involved analysis, but even before that part of my life, I’d played with story creation and journaling. I wish I’d kept more of the songs and poems and drawings I created whilst ignoring my teachers in middle school. …


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Serious Philosophy is 6 months old!

Hey everyone, it sure has been a wild ride. Just six short months ago we were running our first few stories. We technically got our start on March 30, but everything is pretty crazy these days so the 6-month update newsletter you’re reading now is a bit late. That’s okay, we’ll do better next time. I’ve been getting into video content (follow my YouTube Channel here if you like) and would be happy to chat with people from this magazine and spread a bit of awareness of our projects here.

And there is a significant amount of activity there. We’ve got nine stories up at the Existentialist Book Club page, and it doesn’t bother me at all that I’ve written every single one of them! I would love to see some more love for the project, as it’s a great deal of fun, but as I assess my own Medium journey to date I find that this has been one of the most successful ideas to date for me personally. So feel free to enjoy the ride along or get involved if that would make you happier. …


WRITING

We write because we love it. And it makes us better. Here is a short guide to what I’ve learned about writing with power.

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Photo by Ian Schneider on Unsplash

When you write, you want to communicate something to your reader. Feel free to tell them a story, if you want to, or maybe persuade them of something. Be polite, and remain aware that whatever you’re arguing has a counterpoint somewhere in the world. You’re going to be wrong. But that’s how communication works — it’s very difficult to do well.

An old teacher of mine used to quote someone I can’t remember as having said that good writers had to be willing to “call a fool a fool.” I stumbled over that, the first few times I read it. But as I’ve moved through life, the clumsy little phrase has stayed implanted in my mind, like a thorn that simply won’t go away. …

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